Adele Roberts reveals she underwent chemotherapy during Celebrity Bake Off

Adel Roberts revealed that she received chemotherapy during her appearance on Celebrity Bake Off.

The BBC The 44-year-old radio host saw a storm cook in the tent on Sunday night, but revealed she joined in while undergoing chemo.

She explained that she needed an ice machine to keep her cool, and that she couldn’t remember much of her experience on the show.

Adele was diagnosed with stage two bowel cancer in October 2021 and got everything cleared from doctors in June.

In response to a tweet from a fan praising her for her performance on the show, Adele wrote: “Thank you so much Ryan! I was actually doing chemo in the tent.

Candid: Adele Roberts has revealed that she received chemotherapy during her appearance on Celebrity Bake Off

Strong: The BBC radio presenter, 44, was seen storming the tent on Sunday night but revealed she took part while undergoing chemo

Diagnosis: Adele was diagnosed with stage two colon cancer in October 2021 and cleared by doctors in June

Diagnosis: Adele was diagnosed with stage two colon cancer in October 2021 and cleared by doctors in June

“I was overheated most of the time. I had an ice machine to keep me cool.’

She added, “I don’t remember most of this either. I know I had a great day… but looking back now is so special’.

Despite this, Adele still managed to top the class in the technical challenge, after making the best bourbon cookies.

She beat out competition from actor David Morrissey, comedian Lucy Beaumont, diver and Olympic medalist Tom Daley.

It comes after Adele said receiving early treatment for colon cancer “saved her life.”

She has given her support to a new campaign to raise awareness about the symptoms of the condition.

The former Big Brother star, who has documented her treatment on social media, shared how she was “embarrassed” to contact her doctor when she first noticed her symptoms.

She said: ‘It took me a while at first to work up the courage to call my GP. My symptoms seemed like things I could explain away. I didn’t want to be a burden to the NHS and I was ashamed. I shouldn’t have worried.

‘My GP took my concerns seriously, put me at ease and also offered me a home test kit. This meant I could take the test in the comfort of my own home.

“Soon after that, I was diagnosed with stage 2 colon cancer, which almost progressed to stage 3. Getting the help I needed on time saved my life.

“If you’re concerned speak to someone. Early detection saves lives and it helped save mine.”

A new survey from Bowel Cancer UK found that 38% of people cannot name any symptoms of bowel cancer. As part of the charity’s new campaign for Bowel Cancer Awareness Month in April, they’re highlighting some of the key symptoms, including blood in your poop, change in bowel habits, pain or lump in your abdomen, weight loss and fatigue.

Their survey also found that 59% of people said something was likely to prevent them from contacting a doctor if they experienced a change in bowel habits, including difficulty getting an appointment, feeling embarrassed or being too scared that it could be something serious.

Professor Peter Johnson, national clinical director for cancer at NHS England, said: ‘As with all cancers, acting at the first sign of symptoms can make a big difference to how bowel cancer can be treated and how successfully.

‘You are much more likely to survive a cancer that is diagnosed early, which is why the NHS and charities such as Bowel Cancer UK have run awareness campaigns about the signs to look out for.

“Referrals for bowel cancer testing have been at record levels for the past 18 months and we would encourage people to talk to a GP about any symptoms: knowing what’s normal for you and acting if something isn’t right can make all the difference.”

Opening: She explained that she needed an ice machine to keep her cool, and that she couldn't remember much of her experience on the show

Opening: She explained that she needed an ice machine to keep her cool, and that she couldn’t remember much of her experience on the show

Winner! Despite this, Adele still managed to top the class in the technical challenge, after making the best bourbon cookies

Important: The BBC Radio presenter is supporting a new campaign to highlight the symptoms of the condition

Important: The BBC Radio presenter is supporting a new campaign to highlight the symptoms of the condition

Adele said: 'Soon after that I was diagnosed with stage 2 colon cancer which almost progressed to stage 3. Getting the help I needed in time saved my life'

Adele said: ‘Soon after that I was diagnosed with stage 2 colon cancer which almost progressed to stage 3. Getting the help I needed in time saved my life’

Genevieve Edwards, chief executive of Bowel Cancer UK, added: ‘It is worrying that people are unaware of the symptoms of the UK’s second biggest cancer killer.

‘Every 30 minutes someone dies from the disease in the UK, meaning that in the time it takes to watch an episode of your favorite soap, one family loses a loved one to bowel cancer.

“But it doesn’t have to be, because it’s treatable and curable, especially if diagnosed early.” That’s why this Bowel Cancer Awareness Month we’re launching a new campaign to highlight the five red flag symptoms of the disease and ask people to take our KnowTheHigh5 quiz.”

COLON CANCER: WHAT ARE THE WARNING SIGNS?

Colon or colorectal cancer affects the colon, which consists of the colon and rectum.

Such tumors usually develop from cancer precursors called polyps.

Symptoms include:

  • Bleeding from below
  • Blood in stool
  • A change in bowel habits that lasts for at least three weeks
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Extreme, unexplained fatigue
  • Stomach ache

Most cases have no clear cause, but people are more at risk if they:

  • Are over 50
  • Have a family history of the condition
  • Have a personal history of polyps in their gut
  • Suffer from inflammatory bowel disease, such as Crohn’s disease
  • Lead an unhealthy lifestyle

Treatment usually includes surgery and chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

More than nine in ten people with stage 1 colon cancer survive five years or more after their diagnosis.

Unfortunately, only about a third of all colorectal cancers are diagnosed at this early stage.

The majority of people come to the doctor when the disease has spread beyond the wall of the colon or rectum or to distant parts of the body, decreasing the chances of successfully curing colon cancer.

According to figures from Bowel Cancer UK, more than 41,200 people are diagnosed with bowel cancer each year in the UK.

It affects about 40 per 100,000 adults each year in the US, according to the National Cancer Institute.